Easy DIY Bath Bombs for Cold and Sinus Relief

Feeling congested and achy? Bath bombs are the perfect way to relax in winter weather. These little beauties are packed with essential oils that will help clear out your sinuses, ease achy muscles, and promote relaxation.

There are many bath bomb recipes to choose from online so I’m excited that you’re considering trying mine. My bath bomb recipe is designed for a soothing citrus herb cold-busting experience.

This DIY bath bomb recipe uses ingredients that are known to help fight colds and flu symptoms, plus, they’re really fun to make! You may even find you want to make bath bombs for friends and family as gifts for Mother’s Day or Christmas.

And of course, they are great to keep on hand for those days when you’re feeling a bit under the weather. Soak in a warm bath and let these homemade bath bombs work their magic.

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

Benefits of Essential Oils

Essential oils have many benefits for the body, mind, and spirit. They are incredibly fragrant and can be used to promote relaxation, ease stress and anxiety, boost moods, improve sleep quality, and more.

Some essential oils also have antibacterial and antiviral properties that can help fight colds and flu symptoms.

Is it Safe to Use Essential Oils?

Yes! Essential oils are generally safe in low doses, but they are powerful and should be handled with care.

  • Don’t ingest essential oils or use them undiluted on your skin as they can cause burns, inflammation, rash, and itching.
  • Always dilute essential oils with a carrier oil.
  • Dizziness, nausea, and headache are all possible side effects of ingesting large quantities or lengthy durations of essential oils.

It’s best to check with your doctor or a trained aromatherapist before utilizing any essential oils on children or babies. Please check the NAHA guide on essential oil usage for further info.

If you’re pregnant or have a serious health issue, you should not use essential oils without first consulting your doctor.

What Are the Best Essential Oils for Bath Bombs for Colds?

It’s widely thought that essential oils may aid in the reduction of inflammation, as well as help fight germs and speed up recovery.

For this recipe, we like to use eucalyptus oil and peppermint oil. These oils are known to help relieve congestion, sinus pressure, and headaches. You could also try using lavender oil for relaxation or lemon oil for an uplifting citrus scent.

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Some of the best essential oils to use in bath bombs for colds are:

Thyme essential oil

According to a 2011 study, Thyme essential oil has strong antibacterial effects against a variety of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Thyme has anti-spasmodic and anti-inflammatory properties, which may help to prevent cough and soothe a sore throat.

Rosemary Oil

Rosemary essential oil is known for its cleansing and purifying properties and is commonly used in folk medicine as a mild pain reliever. It can help ease achy muscles, and it has a refreshing herbal scent.

Lavender

Lavender is recognized for its calming effects. According to research, Lavender essential oil may have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial qualities.

Clove Oil

Clove oil has been used for a number of applications, including as an antimicrobial, as a pain reliever, and to help with respiratory problems and digestive issues.

Peppermint oil

Peppermint oil is cooling and refreshing, making it perfect for when you’re feeling congested. Menthol, the major component in many throat lozenges and cough drops used to treat sore throats, is found in peppermint.

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties, which are beneficial in the event of an infection.

Eucalyptus Essential Oil

This is a great essential oil to use when you’re feeling congested. It has antibacterial and antiviral properties, and it can help clear out your sinuses. Eucalyptus oil also has a refreshing minty scent that will boost your mood.

Rosemary, Cinnamon, Eucalyptus, and Wild Carrot Essential Oil Blend

According to this 2017 study, a blend of rosemary, cinnamon, eucalyptus, and wild carrot essential oils has both antiviral and antibacterial properties.

The team of researchers behind this recipe believes it may be a potent treatment for both the flu and bacterial pneumonia, which is caused by the flu.

To make your bath bombs extra soothing, add in some oatmeal or lavender buds. Oatmeal helps to relieve itchiness and inflammation, while lavender is known for its relaxing properties.

Are Homemade Bath Bombs Safe?

Yes, homemade bath bombs are safe. However, if you have sensitive skin, you may want to test the essential oils on a small area of skin before using them in a bath bomb. You can also reduce the amount of essential oils used in the recipe.

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

If you have any medical conditions or concerns, please consult your healthcare provider before using any essential oils.

Is Making Homemade Bath Bombs Easy?

Yes! This is a super simple recipe that anyone can make. You’ll need just a few ingredients that you probably already have in your kitchen. The hardest part is choosing which bath bomb mold you want to use and waiting for them to dry!

Do I Need Special Equipment to Make Bath Bombs?

No, you don’t need any special equipment. All you need is a bowl and spoon for mixing, a mold for shaping the bath bombs, and something to press the mixture into the mold (I like to use a small spoon).

Should You Wear Gloves When Making Bath Bombs?

While it isn’t totally necessary to wear gloves when making bath bombs, I highly recommend it. Essential oils can be irritating to the skin, so it’s best to avoid contact with them if possible.

Wearing gloves will also help keep your hands from getting too dry from the baking soda. If you happen to have any cuts or scratches, the citric acid may sting a bit.

How Long Do DIY Bath Bombs Last?

Bath bombs will last for several months if stored in a cool, dry place. Be sure to keep them away from moisture and heat, as this can cause them to dissolve. I like to keep mine in an airtight container in my bathroom cabinet.

How Do You Make a Rainbow Bath Bomb?

Adding food coloring is an easy way to add some color to your DIY bath bomb. You can use liquid or gel food coloring, which you can find at most craft stores.

Start off using a very small amount – like just ONE drop – and mix well before adding more. Just be sure to add it slowly and mix thoroughly, as too much food coloring can make the bath bombs crumble.

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If you want to avoid using food coloring, you can try adding natural colorants like turmeric or beetroot powder. These will add a beautiful yellow or pink hue to your bath bombs.

Can You Make a Bath Bomb Without Cornstarch?

Absolutely! My bath bomb recipe does not use corn starch. Without it, the bath bombs will dissolve a little faster, but I think they are just perfect!

Can Bath Bombs Be Made Without Oil?

Coconut oil is used in many recipes to help the bath bombs hold together, but you can absolutely make them without it. Just be aware that your bath bombs may not last as long and may not hold their shape as well.

I haven’t had a problem with this, but it all depends on the quality of the essential oils you are using.

I’m not a fan of a really oily bath bomb (or what it does to my bathtub!) so my recipe does not use coconut oil. Some individuals prefer the sensation of oils in their bath water, while others dislike it.

If you like the sensation of oils in your bath of you find your bombs fall apart easily, then you can add 1-2 tablespoons of coconut oil to your water before mixing into the dry ingredients.

How to Make DIY Bath Bombs for Cold and Flu Relief

That’s it! Now you have all the information you need to make your very own cold and sinus relief bath bombs. So what are you waiting for? Go gather your supplies and let’s get started!

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Ingredients

Supplies

  • bath bomb molds (I used this silicone mold and only filled them halfway)
  • rubber or latex gloves

Directions

If adding the lavender and citrus zest, do this step first and put it in the bottom of the bath bomb molds (which will be the top when fished).

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

Using a mixing spoon or whisk, carefully mix the dry ingredients (citric acid and baking soda) together in a large bowl. 

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

Next, you’ll add the wet ingredients. Add the essential oils drop by drop and mix thoroughly. You can continue using the spoon or whisk, or you can switch to your hands wearing gloves.

*The essential oils can be a bit powerful all together at once, so plan to do this part outside or under your kitchen stove vent.

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

If you haven’t already put on your gloves, you’ll want to do so now. Slowly mix in the water to the dry mixture with essential oils and combine with your hands until you feel the consistency change from a gritty powder to a wet sand texture that will hold its shape when squeezed together.

Optional: Rub a bit of coconut or jojoba oil into your bath bomb molds to help them release easier.

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

Press the mixture into the bath bomb mold – making sure you press it firmly so that there aren’t any air bubbles in them. Keep in mind that you don’t have to fill the cavity all the way to the top. I chose to fill each only halfway.

Place in a sunny spot and let them dry for 12 to 24 hours (the amount of time will depend on the humidity in your home and the size of bath bombs you choose to make).

They are finished when they feel dry and almost like chalk. Gently remove them from the mold by placing them upside down on a baking tray or cutting board. They should easily come out of the molds, if not, they may need a little more time to dry.

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -

Store them in an air-tight container or bag.

When ready to use, add one or two to your hot bath and soak for about 20 minutes for soothing cold and sinus relief.

DIY Bath Bombs for cold -
Yield: 8

DIY Bath Bombs for Cold and Sinus Relief

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 1 day
Total Time: 30 minutes

When winter weather has you down, fight back with a relaxing warm soak with these homemade bath bombs for cold and sinus relief that you can whip up yourself.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup citric acid
  • up to 2 tablespoons of water
  • 5 drops of orange essential oil
  • 5 drops of eucalyptus essential oil
  • 4 drops of cinnamon bark essential oil
  • 3 drops of rosemary essential oil
  • 2 drops of carrot seed essential oil
  • optional: fresh citrus zest and dried flowers (I used lavender)
  • optional: small amount of coconut or jojoba oil

Instructions

  1. If adding the lavender and citrus zest, do this step first and put it in the bottom of the bath bomb molds (which will be the top when fished).
  2. Wearing gloves, carefully mix the dry ingredients (citric acid and baking soda) together in a large bowl. 
  3. Next, you'll add the wet ingredients. First, add the essential oils drop by drop. *They can be a bit powerful all together at once, so plan to do this part outside or under your kitchen stove vent.
  4. Slowly mix in the water to the dry mixture with essential oils until you feel the consistency change from a gritty powder to a wet sand texture that will hold its shape when squeezed together.
  5. Optional: Rub a bit of coconut or jojoba oil into your bath bomb molds to help them release easier.
  6. Press the mixture into the bath bomb mold - making sure you press it firmly so that there aren’t any air bubbles in them. Keep in mind that you don't have to fill the cavity all the way to the top. I chose to fill each only halfway.
  7. Place in a sunny spot and let them dry for 12 to 24 hours (the amount of time will depend on the humidity in your home and the size of bath bombs you choose to make).
  8. They are finished when they feel dry and almost like chalk. Gently remove them from the mold by placing them upside down on a baking tray or cutting board. They should easily come out of the molds, if not, they may need a little more time to dry.
  9. Store them in an air-tight container or bag.
  10. When ready to use, add one or two to your hot bath and soak for about 20 minutes for soothing cold and sinus relief.

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